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The insane hyper one has arrived!

Just your average paranoid faller that wants to know who the llama is.
Jul 27 '14

thempress:

People look down on McDonald’s employees but fail to realize that if all these folks left McDonald’s and pursued “better careers”  your ass wouldn’t be able to get a McDouble with an Oreo McFlurry at 3am. 

You can’t demand a service while simultaneously degrading those who provide it for you. 

Jul 27 '14

kaiami:

The first year trio are my favorite

Jul 27 '14
"You don’t need another human being to make your life complete, but let’s be honest. Having your wounds kissed by someone who doesn’t see them as disasters in your soul but cracks to put their love into is the most calming thing in this world."
Psych Facts (via recoveryisbeautiful)

(Source: efflorescencebeauty)

Jul 27 '14

(Source: enjol-ras)

Jul 27 '14

catsbeaversandducks:

Via sarah-scales:

We have one kitten left at work and he does not like to be ignored! He demands you pay attention to his cute!

Jul 27 '14

notquitephil:

invertedgender:

calling a man a “pig” is literally dehumanising how do some people not think there’s anything wrong with that how

Because chicks, fillies, birds and bitches never get dehumanised. Those vixens always get away with this kind of shit. Especially the heifers, they’re the worst. What cows.

(Source: toxicnebulae)

Jul 27 '14

foreverdai:

(Source: monettes)

Jul 27 '14

pottergenes:

porcelainanddying:

harrypottersmum:

Remember when Snape made fun of the size of a teenage girls teeth and she subsequently chose to change them so they were permanently smaller? What a hero. 

Remember how close Snape and Lily were and remember the time when he went and saw her dead on the floor and remember how he held her and cried because he was in love with her 

Ah yes, from my favourite book, Harry Potter and the Things That Never Actually Happened

Jul 27 '14

viivus:

I recently did an illustration for Karakasa Games's project, Thunderbeam! You can sign up to get more info/updates about the game here.

I had pretty much free reign on composition, so long as it included the two playable characters appearing in the demo that this image will accompany, was set in a jungle-type landscape, and included the statue. Also get a load of my overly detailed so-called sketches.

Jul 27 '14

(Source: cats4everyone)

Jul 27 '14

kumaton:

politicalsexkitten:

yukaryote:

Why Guys Like Asian Girls - Anna Akana

Everyone needs to watch this video. Now.

100% on point especially about men thinking that having “yellow fever” is a compliment and we’re supposed to be flattered by it. It’s the #1 way to parade around your blatant racism.

I want to be friends with her!

Jul 27 '14

cutebabe:

black-quadrant:

surround yourself with people who

  • praise you because they mean it
  • don’t want anything but your company
  • do their best to understand you
  • you feel like you can confront if you need to
  • (know they can confront you lovingly in turn)
  • make you feel comfortable
  • stick with you through good and bad times
  • are positive influences on your everyday life

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Jul 27 '14
memeguy-com:

This would save a lot of anguish

memeguy-com:

This would save a lot of anguish

Jul 27 '14

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

Jul 27 '14
goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

(Source: NPR)